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What’s the Difference Between Closed and Open Adoption?

If you’re experiencing an unplanned pregnancy and reading this blog, perhaps you’ve already made the brave choice to make an adoption plan for your child. Or maybe you’re still exploring your pregnancy options, wondering if adoption is right for you.

As the birth mother, you will have complete control as you design your adoption plan and decide what kind of relationship, if any, you would like to have with your child.

What is a Closed Adoption?

A closed adoption is an adoption plan that does not include any contact between the birth mother and the adoptive family or child. Typically, in closed adoptions, only relevant, non-identifying information is revealed about both parties.

While closed adoptions were once the norm, today, roughly only 5 percent of adoptions are completely closed and anonymous. If you decide an open adoption plan, in which you have contact with your child moving forward, is not best for you, you will be able to entrust your adoption process with an adoption professional.

In most closed adoption cases, you will have the option to later decide you would like to “open” your adoption plan, whether that’s through letters, photos, calls, or in-person visits. Likewise, depending on the local law regarding adoption, the child may choose to learn your identity when they turn a certain age (typically 18 or 21). 

What is an Open Adoption? 

95 percent of today’s adoptions are open or semi-open, meaning the birth mother has some form of relationship with her child and the adoptive family. In open adoptions, you will be able to decide, with the help of your adoption agency, what family your child will be placed with and what kind of relationship you would like to have with your child post-placement.

Open adoptions include varying levels of relationships including an exchange of identifying information, pre-adoption contact as you prepare for the birth and establish your relationship, and post-adoption contact as you continue your relationship with the family and child.

Open adoption relationships can include in-person, scheduled visits, phone calls, text messages, video chats, emails, or regular letters and photos. It’s absolutely up to you to decide what you want this process and relationship to look like.

Creating an open adoption plan can be a freeing and empowering experience for the birth mother and can benefit the child in the long run. Knowing who their birth parents are may provide a stronger sense of identity as they understand their background, culture, and family of origin. 

Not sure what kind of adoption is right for you? Options for Women is here to help! 

If you’re looking to learn more about the various types of adoption plans and decide what’s best for you and your child, Options for Women is here to help! We can talk through your options with you, listen to you as you process and plan, and could connect you with a loving and supportive adoption agency to help you build a plan that’s best for you!

Schedule your no-cost appointment today!

 

What’s the difference between Plan B and the abortion pill?

There’s a lot of confusion related to Plan B and the abortion pill. If you think you might have an unplanned pregnancy, it’s important to understand, from a medical perspective, the differences between these two medications — from how they work to the risks and side effects associated with each.

Options for Women is here to help answer these commonly asked questions!

What is “Plan B?” 


Plan B, also known as an emergency contraceptive or “the morning-after pill,” is taken to prevent a pregnancy within 72 hours of unprotected sex. This over-the-counter medication prevents unwanted pregnancy by halting ovulation and fertilization. 

Are there side effects related to Plan B? 


Yes. You may experience the following side effects when taking Plan B:

  • Heavy menstrual bleeding
  • Nausea
  • Abdominal pain
  • Fatigue
  • Headache
  • Dizziness

What is the abortion pill? 


The abortion pill, unlike Plan B, ends a pregnancy that has already begun to develop. While Plan B prevents pregnancy from occurring, the abortion pill uses chemical means to terminate a pregnancy in the uterus within the first 10 weeks of gestation. 

The abortion pill is a two-step process. First, Mifepristone is taken to prevent the body from producing the pregnancy-supporting hormone, progesterone. This lack of nutrients causes the pregnancy to end in the uterus. Next, Misoprostol is used to cause contractions and force the pregnancy from the body. 

Are there side effects related to the abortion pill? 


Yes. According to the FDA, the abortion pill may cause some of the following side effects: 

 

  • Heavy bleeding
  • Exhaustion
  • Nausea 
  • Fever and chills
  • Vomiting
  • Headaches
  • Diarrhea
  • Dizziness

In addition to these side effects, the abortion pill can also lead to severe health risks, such as: 

  • Incomplete abortion, requiring emergency surgery
  • Sepsis
  • Infection
  • Hemorrhaging 

Because abortions using the abortion pill are often completed at home without medical supervision, infections and hemorrhaging can go unnoticed and untreated for too long.

Schedule an appointment today to talk to a medical professional about the various risks and side effects related to the abortion pill. 

I’m pregnant — What’s next?  


If you’re experiencing an unplanned pregnancy, remember there’s help available to you! Options for Women is here to provide you with no-cost pregnancy health services, like pregnancy testing and an ultrasound scan, and options consultations to help you make the best decision for your and your future!

Schedule your appointment today!

Why Do I Need an Ultrasound Before Abortion?

Getting an ultrasound isn’t just a step women should take if they’re planning to give birth. In fact, ultrasounds are essential to give you more information about the pregnancy and your body so you can stay healthy and safe. 

Here are five good reasons you should get an ultrasound before your abortion:

1. An ultrasound is necessary to determine what kind of abortion you’re eligible for. 


Because an ultrasound will tell you how far along you are in the pregnancy, it will let you know if you’re eligible for the abortion pill or a surgical abortion. The abortion pill can only be taken during the first 10 weeks of pregnancy, so it’s important to know exactly how far along you are.Woman wonders why she needs an Ultrasound Before Abortion

An ultrasound scan is the most effective method of determining the potential due date and stage of pregnancy, even for women who carefully track their cycles and know when they’ve had unprotected sex.

2. Ultrasounds will reveal whether or not the pregnancy is viable.

 

A positive pregnancy test simply means your body is producing detectable levels of the pregnancy hormone hCG (Human Chorionic Gonadotropin). However, this does not necessarily mean you are pregnant with a viable pregnancy. An ultrasound will reveal where the pregnancy is located and if it’s viable.


3. An ultrasound will help identify any major health issues.

An ultrasound scan will help you identify any concerning health issues you may be experiencing alongside your pregnancy. One to be aware of is ectopic pregnancy, in which the pregnancy is located somewhere other than the uterus. Ectopic pregnancies are not viable and can be extremely harmful, if not fatal, if left untreated.


4. Getting an ultrasound is one more means of gathering as much information as possible. 

Making an informed choice regarding your pregnancy means you’ve taken all the steps necessary to learn about all your options. An ultrasound is one of the best ways to learn about your pregnancy, your health, and the choices available to you.

 

5. They’re available at no cost! 

Getting an ultrasound may cost extra at the abortion clinic, however, your local pregnancy medical clinic will administer one at no cost to you!

Schedule your appointment for a no-cost ultrasound at Options for Women today!

Pregnancy Services During COVID-19 Pandemic

Last year was filled with anxiety, stress, and a constant sense of the unknown. One thing is for sure, COVID-19 has impacted the lives of all of us. Parents are concerned about their children, older adults are at the highest risk, and pregnant women wonder if it will infect their unborn babies. Woman Quarantining During Covid-19

 

Pregnancy and COVID-19

According to a Harvard Medical Study, pregnant women “are just as likely as the general public to develop symptoms if infected with the new coronavirus.” In other words, being pregnant does not make you more susceptible to getting the disease. 

 

What We Know About Pregnancy and COVID-19

A study in Los Angeles included 134 pregnant women who tested positive for the disease. More than 82% of the women had symptoms. Of those who had already given birth, none of their babies were infected. These results suggest the virus does not spread through the amniotic fluid or across the placenta. 

Interestingly, a recent study of 215 pregnant women at two New York hospitals found a few of the women tested positive for COVID-19 but had no symptoms. Of the 33 women who tested positive, 29 (or 88%) did not have symptoms. These results reveal how it is possible for many people to have the virus and not even know it.

The Harvard Medical Study also cited a smaller study that suggested mothers with COVID-19 did not spread the virus to babies in their breast milk. It is recommended that if you choose to breastfeed to be sure and wear a cloth mask, wash your hands thoroughly, and always cough into a tissue. Never put a mask on a baby under the age of two.

 

How have Pregnancy Medical Clinics  responded?

Pregnancy medical clinics  across the nation rapidly responded to the ever-changing requirements for taking care of patients during the outbreak. 

Most clinics, to keep patients and employees safe, require an online form to be completed before an appointment. Many updated their intake procedures, conducting visits in one room only, taking temperatures at the door, and limiting the number of people, all in an effort to curb the spread of COVID-19. 

Options for Women continues to see clients while following strict guidelines. Here is what we recommend:

  • Avoid close contact with others by following the social distancing rule of 6 feet.
  • Wash your hands regularly and thoroughly.
  • Use hand sanitizer if hand washing is not available.
  • If you have any questions, our medical professionals are happy to talk with you and answer more specifically what you may be wondering.

Please contact us to schedule an appointment for free and confidential pregnancy services today. We’re here with open doors because we know your needs don’t wait.

What is the Abortion Pill?

Unplanned pregnancies are often accompanied by a slew of emotions — most commonly those of fear and worry. As you consider the options in front of you, it’s important to gather all of the necessary information so you can be empowered to make the decision that’s best for you!

When it comes to an unplanned pregnancy you have three options — parenting, adoption, and abortion. While abortion is often portrayed in the media, when it comes to making a decision for your life, it typically looks a bit different and it’s important to understand the options available to you.

Many woman experiencing unplanned pregnancies are overcome with anxiety and uncertainty, making them feel like abortion is their only option. The abortion pill is commonly sold as the “easy” choice for women looking to end their pregnancies. While it isn’t as invasive as surgical abortions, the pill is still a serious medical procedure and comes with its own list of side effects and risks.

Continue reading to learn more about the abortion pill, how it works, and its various risks and side effects. 

What is the abortion pill?

The abortion pill is a medical form of abortion most often offered to women in the first 11 weeks of pregnancy. A medical abortion is a two-pill process that is typically started at a doctor’s office and completed at home. The pill is not to be confused with “Plan B” or “The Morning After Pill.” These pills stop a pregnancy from happening, while the abortion pill terminates a pregnancy that has already begun to develop.

 

How does the abortion pill work?

The first step of the abortion pill is called Mifepristone. This pill stops the production of progesterone, which is a natural hormone the body creates to help the pregnancy grow and develop. This initial step is typically performed at a doctor’s office, while the second pill, Misoprostol, is taken at home. Misoprostol causes contractions and will cause the pregnancy to expel from the uterus.

What are the side effects of the abortion pill?

While this sounds as simple as popping a few pills, it’s important to remember that the abortion pill is a serious medical procedure and can be accompanied by several intense side effects. If you’re considering the abortion pill, take time to learn about each risk and talk to a medical professional about your current medical conditions and any concerns you might have.

Some common side effects of the abortion pill include:Woman Considering the Abortion Pill

  • Abdominal Pain 
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Heavy/persistent bleeding

In addition to these typical side effects, there are a few other serious risks to consider prior to scheduling your appointment.

First, if the abortion pill does not effectively end the pregnancy and you experience an “incomplete abortion,” surgery will be required immediately.

Additionally, many women also experience emotional and mental repercussions following their abortions. Because medical abortions are completed at home and typically in isolation, women often report feelings of trauma that can last years beyond the abortion itself. 


What do I need to do before I take the abortion pill?

Prior to scheduling your abortion appointment, you’ll want to confirm your pregnancy with a lab-quality test. These tests, provided at no cost at your local pregnancy medical clinic , will deliver the most accurate results by measuring the hCG hormone in your urine. 

Once you have a positive test, you’ll want to schedule an ultrasound scan to confirm your pregnancy is viable. You may be wondering why you would need an ultrasound if you’re getting an abortion. Getting an ultrasound scan will help you gather necessary information about your pregnancy: its location, gestational age, and viability. This info will determine if you’re eligible for a medical abortion. 

To schedule a no-cost pregnancy test or ultrasound with Options for Women, click here!

If you’re experiencing an unplanned pregnancy or are worried you might be pregnant, your friends at Options for Women are here to help! We’re passionate about providing resources and information at no cost so that you can make the best decision for you and your future! 


Learn more!

 

 

Minnesota Abortion Laws in 2021

If you think you might be pregnant and are considering abortion, there are several laws in Minnesota you should be aware of to protect your health and rights.

Abortion Laws in Minnesota

First, you should know no one can force you to have an abortion against your will. Contact our clinic to learn about the resources available to you if you are pregnant and feeling pressure.

If someone is pressuring you to have an abortion procedure, please contact your local law enforcement right away. It is also illegal to perform an abortion for a minor under the age of 18 without the consent of her parents. If you are younger than 18 and someone is pressuring you to have an abortion let your parents and authorities know right away. If telling your parents feels too hard, we can help!

By law, in Minnesota, you can have an abortion if you are in the first 20 weeks of your pregnancy, after 20 weeks it is illegal to have an abortion unless your health or life is at stake. Medical abortion is only available through the first eleven weeks of pregnancy, while a surgical abortion is available during the first 20 weeks.   

Abortion Laws to Protect Your Health

Because abortion is a serious medical procedure, there are laws designed to protect you and your health.

Abortions Must Be Performed By a Doctor

First, Minnesota law requires all abortion procedures to be performed by a trained medical doctor.  

That’s because abortion is a medical procedure with possible risks and complications, both during the process and potential long-lasting complications or side effects. 

You Must Know About Abortion Side Effects

Also, Minnesota state law requires that a doctor, or abortion clinic staff member, provide you with all the information regarding complications and risks associated with an abortion procedure. It’s your health and future, so you deserve to have all the information you need to make the best decision for yourself. If an abortion provider does not provide you with this information, discourages you from reading this information, or provides the information in a manner that doesn’t allow you to understand all the details, you should immediately seek another medical provider for your health and safety. 

24-Hour Waiting Period

Minnesota abortion providers are also required to provide a 24-hour waiting period from the time you receive the necessary information about abortion to the time the abortion procedure is performed. This allows you time to evaluate the information and consider your options. If an abortion clinic or doctor does not follow this 24-waiting period and tries to perform an abortion procedure before it has ended, you should seek the assistance of another medical provider for your health and safety.

Your Sign Off Is Required

Abortion clinics are also legally required to have you sign a form to acknowledge they have provided you with all the required information about an abortion procedure. If the abortion clinic or doctor has not followed any of the above guidelines, do not sign any document and seek the assistance of another medical provider for your health and safety.

Just like any other serious medical procedure, you deserve to know all the facts as well as all your options before making a decision. 

Schedule a Free Appointment

If you are pregnant or think you might be pregnant, please contact us right away. Our staff is here to help you understand all your options and empower you to make the best decision for your health and future.